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Buds of the museum: First recreational marijuana sold legally in Seattle donated for display

Museum of History and Industry Executive Director Leonard Garfield accepts the donation Tuesday July 22, 2014, in Seattle, of the first legal recreational marijuana purchase in Seattle from Deb Green, right, who made the purchase at Cannabis City on July 8, 2014. (AP Photo/seattlepi.com, Joshua Trujillo)

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Museum of History and Industry Executive Director Leonard Garfield accepts the donation Tuesday July 22, 2014, in Seattle, of the first legal recreational marijuana purchase in Seattle from Deb Green, right, who made the purchase at Cannabis City on July 8, 2014. (AP Photo/seattlepi.com, Joshua Trujillo)

SEATTLE - The first recreational marijuana sold legally in Seattle will be put on display at the city's Museum of History and Industry after a woman donated part of her purchase Tuesday.

Deb Greene, a 65-year-old retiree, waited all night to be first in line at the Cannabis City store when legal pot sales began in Washington on July 8. Cannabis City also donated items from its opening day, including the receipt of the first purchase.

Washington and Colorado stunned much of the world by voting in November 2012 to legalize recreational marijuana for adults over 21 and to create state-licensed systems for growing, selling and taxing the pot. Sales began in Colorado on Jan. 1.

The Seattle museum's curator, Kristin Halunen, put on purple latex gloves to accept the donation of marijuana and other paraphernalia on Tuesday.

Greene had ordered 8 grams, which cost $160 including tax two weeks ago. She donated a 2-gram sealed package of marijuana, the T-shirt she wore as she waited hours to make the purchase and the book she read while in line.

Greene reached out to the museum to donate the items, and the owner of Cannabis City, James Lathrop, also contributed, museum spokeswoman Jackie Durbin said.

The museum has been collecting artifacts on Washington's pot initiative and plans to display the items this fall. It is also hosting a travelling exhibit in April 2015 to explore prohibition, and marijuana will be incorporated into that exhibit, Durbin said.

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