Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Business
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Detroit's breakneck speed hastened start of largest US municipal bankruptcy trial this week

In this July 16, 2013 aerial file photo, the downtown of the city of Detroit is shown. Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr raised more than a few eyebrows a year ago when he took the city into bankruptcy and predicted it would be out by the time his term expired in fall 2014. Because it is by far the largest city to file for municipal bankruptcy and the issues were so complex many experts predicted it would take years to resolve. But the city will take a major step toward that goal with a trial in federal bankruptcy court that starts Tuesday, Sept 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

Enlarge Image

In this July 16, 2013 aerial file photo, the downtown of the city of Detroit is shown. Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr raised more than a few eyebrows a year ago when he took the city into bankruptcy and predicted it would be out by the time his term expired in fall 2014. Because it is by far the largest city to file for municipal bankruptcy and the issues were so complex many experts predicted it would take years to resolve. But the city will take a major step toward that goal with a trial in federal bankruptcy court that starts Tuesday, Sept 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

DETROIT - The trial to determine whether bankrupt Detroit's restructuring plan will be approved is set to begin just over a year after the city sought court protection in July 2013.

The confirmation trial for the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history starts Tuesday in federal court.

Bill Nowling, spokesman for Detroit's emergency manager, says the city hopes to cut $12 billion in unsecured debt to a "much more manageable" $5 billion.

Massive debt, thousands of creditors and complex union and pension issues had many experts thinking Detroit's bankruptcy would take years to resolve. Two California cities — Stockton and San Bernardino — that filed a year before Detroit have cases that continue to drag on.

Pensioners already have approved the settlement plan, but at least one creditor says it is discriminatory.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Election 2014
Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media

Canadian Mortgage Rates