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The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

For Obama, NSA review a quest to regain public trust in surveillance operations

President Barack Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, in Washington. Faced with Edward Snowden’s first secret surveillance leaks, President Barack Obama’s message to Americans boiled down to this: trust me. But as the disclosures piled up, it became clear to the president that the public’s confidence in the government’s oversight of the spying programs was shaky. That jarring realization spurred a months-long White House review that will culminate Friday with new recommendations aimed in part at restoring the public’s trust in a surveillance apparatus expected to remain largely in place. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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President Barack Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, in Washington. Faced with Edward Snowden’s first secret surveillance leaks, President Barack Obama’s message to Americans boiled down to this: trust me. But as the disclosures piled up, it became clear to the president that the public’s confidence in the government’s oversight of the spying programs was shaky. That jarring realization spurred a months-long White House review that will culminate Friday with new recommendations aimed in part at restoring the public’s trust in a surveillance apparatus expected to remain largely in place. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

WASHINGTON - Faced with Edward Snowden's first leaks about the government's sweeping surveillance apparatus, President Barack Obama's message to Americans boiled down to this: trust me.

But the leaks kept coming. They painted a picture of a clandestine spy program that indiscriminately scooped up phone and Internet records, while also secretly keeping tabs on the communications of friendly foreign leaders, like Germany's Angela Merkel (AHN'-geh-lah MEHR'-kuhl).

On Friday, Obama will unveil a much-anticipated blueprint on the future of those endeavours. His changes appear to be an implicit acknowledgement that the trust he thought Americans would have in the spy operations is shaky at best.

His focus is expected to be on steps that increase oversight and transparency while largely leaving the framework of the programs in place.

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More government spook jobs. Of course, what an obvious solution!

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