Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Business
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Occupiers take credit for declaring mayday on the wealth gap, but experts are divided

FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks about the economy and growing economic inequality, at the Town Hall Education Arts Recreation Campus in Washington. The president said the income gap between America's rich and poor is a

Enlarge Image

FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks about the economy and growing economic inequality, at the Town Hall Education Arts Recreation Campus in Washington. The president said the income gap between America's rich and poor is a "defining challenge of our time." Some of the wealth gap’s earliest champions - a group of bearded and tattooed protesters who called themselves Occupiers - made the problem famous in 2011 when they took up residence in a small granite plaza near the New York Stock Exchange. Two and a half years later, long after Occupy Wall Street fizzled out, income inequality is finally being taken seriously by world leaders. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Glimmers of Occupy Wall Street will surface this week in some cities as activists join rallies for workers' rights, as they do every year on May Day.

Occupiers won't show up en masse, but they will hold signs and chant, railing against a variety of social and political issues. That includes an issue that has gone viral: income inequality.

How much credit Occupy deserves for propelling the issue onto the political agenda is a matter of debate.

But Occupy ignited a global conversation. Protesters popularized the concept of income inequality and made their rallying cry of "We are the 99 per cent" part of the global lexicon.

Many Occupiers remain frustrated that the gulf between rich and poor remains vast.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Sudden Surge: Flood of 2014
Opportunity Magazine — The Bakken
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media

Canadian Mortgage Rates