Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Business
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Question after huge wildfire: Remove dead trees and replant, or let nature take its course?

In this Friday, July 25, 2014 photo, Chad Hanson, of the John Muir Project, inspects a young Ponderosa Pine tree growing in an area destroyed by 2013's Rim Fire, near Groveland, Calif. Nearly a year after the Rim Fire charred thousands of acres of forest in California's High Sierra, a debate rages over what to do with the dead trees, salvage the timber to pay for forest replanting and restoration or let nature take its course. Hanson and other environmentalist say that the burned trees and new growth beneath them create vital habitat for dwindling bird such as spotted owls, and black-backed woodpeckers and other wildlife. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Enlarge Image

In this Friday, July 25, 2014 photo, Chad Hanson, of the John Muir Project, inspects a young Ponderosa Pine tree growing in an area destroyed by 2013's Rim Fire, near Groveland, Calif. Nearly a year after the Rim Fire charred thousands of acres of forest in California's High Sierra, a debate rages over what to do with the dead trees, salvage the timber to pay for forest replanting and restoration or let nature take its course. Hanson and other environmentalist say that the burned trees and new growth beneath them create vital habitat for dwindling bird such as spotted owls, and black-backed woodpeckers and other wildlife. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

GROVELAND, Calif. - Nearly a year since a historic wildfire charred a huge swath of California's High Sierra, debate rages over what to do with millions of dead trees left in its wake: truck them to lumber mills or let nature to take its course?

One side argues the blackened dead trees and new growth beneath them already sprouting to life create vital habitat for dwindling birds such as spotted owls and black-backed woodpeckers. Others say time is running out on a golden opportunity to salvage timber to pay for replanting and restoring the forest.

The U.S. Forest Service is expected to unveil its final decision in the coming weeks on how much of the land burned by the wildfire, known as the Rim Fire, can be logged.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100

Social Media

Canadian Mortgage Rates