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Reporting based on Snowden's leaks about US surveillance wins Polk Awards

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Four journalists who reported on the extent of the U.S. National Security Agency's secret surveillance based on documents leaked by Edward Snowden are among the winners of the 65th annual George Polk Awards in Journalism.

Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill and Laura Poitras of The Guardian and Barton Gellman of The Washington Post will receive the award for national security reporting for stories based on secret documents leaked by Snowden, a former intelligence analyst.

The awards were announced Sunday by Long Island University.

This year's Polk Awards will be given out April 11. The awards were created in 1949 in honour of CBS reporter George W. Polk, who was killed while covering the Greek civil war.

James Yardley of The New York Times will be honoured for foreign reporting for coverage of the Rana Plaza collapse in Bangladesh, which killed more than 1,100 clothing workers.

The award for national reporting will go to Eli Saslow of The Washington Post for stories about some of the 47 million Americans who receive aid from the federal food stamp program.

Andrea Elliott of The New York Times will receive the award for local reporting for "Invisible Child," her five-part series focusing on Dasani Coates, one of 22,000 homeless children in New York City.

The award for business reporting will go to Alison Fitzgerald, Daniel Wagner, Lauren Kyger and John Dunbar of The Center for Public Integrity for "After the Meltdown," a three-part series demonstrating that regulators have failed to hold a single major player on Wall Street accountable for the behaviour that sparked the 2008 financial crisis.

Freelance reporter Matthieu Aikins will receive the award for magazine reporting for a Rolling Stone story that presented evidence that a 12-man U.S. Army Special Forces unit and their Afghan translators executed 10 civilians in the Nerkh district of Wardak province of Afghanistan. The Army has opened a criminal inquiry, and human rights organizations have called for impartial investigations.

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