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Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

Pet's Best Friend - Beware jerky treats from China

Most pet owners give treats to their pets — whether it’s a part of training or just a special something.

It’s hard to believe these tasty rewards could be dangerous for your dog.

However, to date, more than 1,000 people have submitted concerns to the Food and Drug Administration regarding one treat in particular — chicken jerky treats.

The FDA first issued a warning in 2007 when they started receiving reports of illness associated with the consumption of chicken jerky treats. There have been multiple subsequent complaints and the FDA continues to warn consumers about chicken jerky treats. Some reports in 2012 have also included incidents with duck and sweet potato treats.

No specific products have been recalled, although the jerky treats causing problems are the ones that are imported from China. The FDA is conducting an investigation into the source of the problem, but until a contaminant is determined, a recall will not take place.

The FDA continues to warn consumers to be wary of jerky treats manufactured in China, and suggests steering away from these products.

However, they suggest that anyone wishing to feed their pets these treats watch for signs of illness hours and even days after consumption. The symptoms include a decreased appetite, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, increased urination and increased water consumption.

If symptoms are present for more than 24 hours, it would be advisable to consult your veterinarian.

In some of the cases, kidney damage and increased glucose have been reported. While the dogs in most reported cases have survived, there have been a few that have not.

If you have experienced any problems with a pet that has consumed jerky treats, please report concerns to the FDA.

The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association also warns about these tainted treats. They published a report, warning that several vets in Ontario have noticed signs similar to Falconi Syndrome in dogs that regularly ingested chicken jerky treats manufactured in China.

Falconi Syndrome, a condition that affects the kidneys and causes glucose and electrolytes o leak into the urine, is uncommon and often confused with diabetes.

Its symptoms are the same as those reported by the FDA, and the CVMA is concerned about a possible link between these imported jerky treats and Falconi Syndrome.

As the investigation into chicken jerky treats imported from China continues, it might be best to look at a healthy and safe option.

There are so many alternative treat options that do not come with the number of concerns being raised about these ones.

Dana Grove is an animal lover who works with several pet organizations in Brandon.

» communitynews@brandonsun.com

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition January 17, 2013

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Most pet owners give treats to their pets — whether it’s a part of training or just a special something.

It’s hard to believe these tasty rewards could be dangerous for your dog.

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Most pet owners give treats to their pets — whether it’s a part of training or just a special something.

It’s hard to believe these tasty rewards could be dangerous for your dog.

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