Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Entertainment
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

CANNES WATCH: Tommy Lee Jones premieres Western with a female perspective in 'The Homesman'

actress Hilary Swank, second from right, poses with director Tommy Lee Jones, actress Sonia Richter, second from left, and actress Miranda Otto during a photo call for The Homesman at the 67th international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Sunday, May 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Enlarge Image

actress Hilary Swank, second from right, poses with director Tommy Lee Jones, actress Sonia Richter, second from left, and actress Miranda Otto during a photo call for The Homesman at the 67th international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Sunday, May 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

CANNES, France - In westerns, women are usually bit players, relegated to fleeting domestic scenes before the men set out on adventure.

On Sunday at the Cannes Film Festival, Tommy Lee Jones premiered a western from a more female perspective. His "The Homesman" is about a single woman farmer (Hilary Swank) on the Nebraska plains during Westward expansion.

Called "bossy" by suitors, the strong-willed Mary Bee Cuddy volunteers to take three women who have grown crazy on the desolate landscape to Iowa. She enlists an outlaw, played by Jones, to help on the weeks-long journey. Cuddy and the women are generally treated as mere cargo in the race West — which Jones said he considers historical roots to sexism today.

"I don't think there's a woman in this room has never felt objectified or trivialized because of her gender," Jones said to festival reporters. "There's a reason for that and a history of that, and I think that's an interesting thing."

It's the second time directing a feature for the 67-year-old Jones, whose 2005 "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada" was warmly received by critics. "The Homesman," which co-stars Meryl Streep, John Lithgow and Hailee Steinfeld, had a more mixed reaction in Cannes.

Jones declined to see his film as a western.

"I don't understand that word," he said of "genre." ''It's a consideration of the history of Westward expansion, a way of looking at what the school children of America learn on the subject of Manifest Destiny."

— Jake Coyle, AP Film Writer, http://twitter.com/jake_coyle

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Sudden Surge: Flood of 2014
Opportunity Magazine — The Bakken
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media