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Father of Breivik, Norway's convicted mass-murderer, questions his own behaviour

COPENHAGEN - The father of Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian who killed 77 people in 2011, has written a book that questions his behaviour as a parent.

Jens Breivik, a retired Norwegian diplomat living in southern France, got a divorce when his son was only a year old and claims to have had little contact with the boy.

But the new book is titled "My Fault?"

On Wednesday's the Juritzen publishing house released a few quotes from the work, including this one: "I feel guilty. And I feel responsible. What if I had been a better father? Would Anders have done what he did?" At a news conference the company's top official, Arve Juritzen, said Breivik wrote "My Fault?" with the help of a ghost-writer and that a copy of the book will be offered to the younger Breivik before its publication.

Before her death in 2013, the author's former wife, Wenche Breivik, accused him of being a domestic tyrant and absent father who had lost contact with his son as a teenager.

Anders, a far-right fanatic, confessed to the July 22, 2011, attacks during which he killed eight people in a bombing attack on the government headquarters in Oslo, Norway, and 69 in a shooting spree at the left-wing Labor Party's youth camp on Utoya island.

He is serving a 21-year prison sentence for his crime, which can be extended for as long as he's considered dangerous to society.

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