Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Entertainment
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Maxine Kumin, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former US poet laureate, dies at 88 in NH

FILE - In this Sept. 21, 1999 file photo, poet Maxine Kumin poses for a photo in Warner, N.H. Kumin, a prolific New England poet and former U.S. poet laureate who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for her work

Enlarge Image

FILE - In this Sept. 21, 1999 file photo, poet Maxine Kumin poses for a photo in Warner, N.H. Kumin, a prolific New England poet and former U.S. poet laureate who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for her work "Up Country," died Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 at her home in Warner, according to The Bennett Funeral Home in Concord. She was 88. (AP Photo/Concord Monitor, Ken Williams, File)

WARNER, N.H. - Maxine Kumin, a prolific New England poet and U.S. poet laureate who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for her work "Up Country," has died. She was 88.

Kumin, who wrote more than three dozen books of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and children's literature, died Thursday at her home in Warner after a year of failing health, said the Bennett Funeral Home in Concord.

Kumin was an advocate for women writers, social justice and animal rights. Her final work, "And Short the Season," is scheduled to be released later this year.

Born in Philadelphia, she graduated from Radcliffe College and lived for a while in Newton, Mass.

Kumin's family said her work was marked by a love and deep observation of nature and an unwavering commitment to the craft of writing. They said a celebration of her life and work will be held in the spring.

Kumin's work has been recognized with numerous other awards, including the Ruth Lilly Prize, the Harvard Medal, the Levinson Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Poetry Award.

Kumin also was a prominent teacher of writing, occupying graduate or undergraduate visiting chairs or fellowships at Boston University, Brandeis, Columbia, MIT, Princeton and other institutions. At New England College in Henniker, N.H., she helped establish a new poetry master of fine arts program.

Kumin's work and life were linked to those of poet Anne Sexton, a close friend and collaborator who committed suicide in 1974.

In a 2010 interview with the Greater Brockton (Mass.) Library Poetry Series, Kumin said one of her early motivations to become a poet was reading "A Child's Garden of Verses" by Robert Louis Stevenson. She said many of those poems, which were read to her, were locked in her brain because of their melody. She said her life raising horses also motivated her work.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Submit a Random Act of Kindness
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media