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AP NewsBreak: Survey finds employees at contaminated nuclear site wary of challenging managers

FILE - In this July 14, 2010 file photo, workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation stand near a tank farm where highly radioactive waste is stored underground near Richland, Wash. Few of the U.S. Department of Energy workers who are helping build the plant feel they can openly challenge decisions made by management, according to a report obtained Tuesday, June 24, 2014, by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Shannon Dininny, File)

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FILE - In this July 14, 2010 file photo, workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation stand near a tank farm where highly radioactive waste is stored underground near Richland, Wash. Few of the U.S. Department of Energy workers who are helping build the plant feel they can openly challenge decisions made by management, according to a report obtained Tuesday, June 24, 2014, by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Shannon Dininny, File)

SPOKANE, Wash. - Few of the U.S. Department of Energy workers who are helping build a plant to treat the most dangerous radioactive wastes at a nuclear site in Washington state feel they can openly challenge decisions made by management, according to a report obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press.

The survey conducted by the department shows only 30 per cent of its employees at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation feel they can question their bosses.

The results were somewhat better for plant managers who responded, with 65 per cent saying they could openly challenge decisions by higher-level managers.

Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon said the study shows recent allegations of retaliation against Hanford workers who raised safety concerns made other employees less likely to come forward.

Hanford, near Richland in south central Washington, is engaged in a multi-decade cleanup of the nation's largest collection of nuclear waste.

Two people who recently raised concerns about the design and safety of the unfinished Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford lost their jobs. Donna Busche was fired earlier this year, while Walter Tamosaitis, a 40-year Hanford employee, was laid off last year.

The U.S. Department of Energy has asked its Office of Inspector General to investigate Busche's firing.

Hanford was created during the Manhattan Project in World War II to make nuclear weapons, and continued making plutonium for the next four decades of the Cold War. The site now stores some 56 million gallons of radioactive wastes in 177 giant underground tanks. Many of those tanks have exceeded their design lifespans and are leaking.

The long-delayed Waste Treatment Plant is intended to turn that waste into glass logs for eventual burial. The $12 billion plant is a one-of-a-kind facility whose construction has been halted by design and safety concerns. The plant is Energy Department's largest construction project, and is scheduled to open by 2019.

The survey was taken between December 2013 and March 2014. All workers in the department's Office of River Protection were invited to participate, and about two-thirds did, the report said.

Wyden called 70 per cent a "shockingly high number" of employees who feel they cannot speak freely about safety concerns.

"I have warned that allowing retaliation against whistleblowers would make employees less likely to come forward with legitimate health and safety concerns," Wyden said. "This report unfortunately confirms those fears."

The survey also found just 40 per cent of employees believed constructive criticism was encouraged. Slightly more than 50 per cent of employees agreed with the statement that management wanted concerns reported.

The Energy Department also surveyed employees of Bechtel National Inc., the private contractor building the treatment plant, and its main subcontractor URS Corp. Forty-five per cent of those employees felt they could openly challenge decisions made by management, and 70 per cent of managers felt they could openly challenge higher-ups, according to that report.

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