Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Lifestyles
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Child deaths in traffic accidents fell 43 per cent in 10 years; experts credit safety seats

FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2005 file photo, South Windsor Police Department Community Service Officer Robin Massanti helps Debra Mlinek from West Suffield secure her daughter, Eliza, five months, in her car seat during a Child Passenger Safety Clinic in Hartford, Conn. In a report covering 2002 through 2011, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials say the increased use of car seats and booster seats drove a decline in children who died in crashes. (AP Photo/Fred Beckham)

Enlarge Image

FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2005 file photo, South Windsor Police Department Community Service Officer Robin Massanti helps Debra Mlinek from West Suffield secure her daughter, Eliza, five months, in her car seat during a Child Passenger Safety Clinic in Hartford, Conn. In a report covering 2002 through 2011, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials say the increased use of car seats and booster seats drove a decline in children who died in crashes. (AP Photo/Fred Beckham)

ATLANTA - Children are dying less often in traffic accidents: Over a decade, the number who died in crashes dropped by 43 per cent, according to a new government report.

Health officials say the increased use of car seats and booster seats drove the decline. Still, one-third of the children 12 and under who died in 2011 were not buckled up.

"The first step is buckling up. Every child, of every age, on every trip," said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC report focused on crash deaths of children 12 and under and covered 2002 through 2011, when traffic fatalities overall declined to levels not seen since the 1940s.

Young children traditionally have been only a small fraction of total traffic deaths. In the last year of the study, children accounted for 650 of the 21,000 deaths of drivers and passengers. Preliminary CDC figures for 2012 show child deaths continued to fall, to 637.

"Children aren't going drinking, and they're not typically out at night," said Jonathan Adkins, deputy director of the Governors Highway Safety Association.

Teens and young adults account for the largest share of deaths, he added.

The CDC study was not designed to answer why the deaths of younger children declined. But experts credited a large growth in state laws requiring car seats and booster seats, and in programs that promote buckling kids up.

But there's been a racial disparity in how well that's worked. Almost half of the black and Hispanic children who died in crashes in 2009 and 2010 were not in safety seats or wearing seat belts, compared to a quarter of white deaths, according to the CDC.

That may be related to income, experts said. Car seats can run well over $100 and be challenging to install. Larger proportions of minority families may have trouble getting the money or help to put them in. Frieden noted there are community programs that provide help and subsidies for car seats.

Health officials urge parents to keep all children 12 and under in the back seat, and use car seats and booster seats until seat belts fit properly. They recommend that car seats should face the rear up to age 2.

Last month, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration proposed new regulations to better protect kids in car seats from side-impact crashes.

___

Online:

CDC report: http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Submit a Random Act of Kindness
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media