Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Lifestyles
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Drowsy driving can mean wheel trouble: CDC offers tips on safe driving this holiday weekend

FILE - This April 4, 2002 file photo provided by the National Transportation Safety Board shows a 15-passenger

Enlarge Image

FILE - This April 4, 2002 file photo provided by the National Transportation Safety Board shows a 15-passenger "Tippy Toes" day-care bus after it crashed into a bridge killing the driver and four of the six children aboard. The National Transportation Safety Board said the driver fell asleep. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its latest drowsy driving report on Thursday, July 3, 2014. According to a new survey, about 1 in 25 adults say they recently fell asleep while driving. (AP Photo/National Transportation Safety Board, File)

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Many millions of U.S. drivers are expected to hit the highways over the holiday weekend — and some of them may be nodding off behind the wheel.

According to a government survey released Thursday, about 1 in 25 adults say they recently fell asleep while driving.

The government estimates about 3 per cent of fatal traffic crashes involve drowsy drivers, but other estimates have put the number as high as one-third.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its latest drowsy driving report on Thursday, along with these tips on how to stay awake:

—Get enough sleep the night before.

—Avoid alcohol and other sedatives before driving.

—Break up the drive with naps, coffee breaks or a change of drivers.

—Avoid driving late at night or very early in the morning, when your body is telling you that you should still be in bed.

—If you notice yourself beginning to doze, pull over immediately.

Some warning signs: Frequent yawning, drifting from your lane or driving over a shoulder rumble strip, missing exit or traffic signs, difficulty remembering the last few miles driven.

An estimated 41 million Americans are expected to travel at least 50 miles or more this Independence Day weekend — up 2 per cent from last year, according to auto club AAA. About 85 per cent will be travelling by car.

___

Online:

CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media