Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Lifestyles
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Hong Kong starts destroying ivory stockpile, becoming latest to send anti-poaching warning

A worker monitors a screen, center, showing the confiscated ivory being burnt in a rotary kiln at a chemical waste treatment center in Hong Kong Thursday, May 15, 2014. Hong Kong has started incinerating its nearly 30-ton stockpile of confiscated ivory to show it's serious about cracking down on an illegal wildlife trade that is devastating Africa's elephant population. Authorities on Thursday destroyed the first batch by burning a metric ton of elephant tusks in a rotary kiln. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Enlarge Image

A worker monitors a screen, center, showing the confiscated ivory being burnt in a rotary kiln at a chemical waste treatment center in Hong Kong Thursday, May 15, 2014. Hong Kong has started incinerating its nearly 30-ton stockpile of confiscated ivory to show it's serious about cracking down on an illegal wildlife trade that is devastating Africa's elephant population. Authorities on Thursday destroyed the first batch by burning a metric ton of elephant tusks in a rotary kiln. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

HONG KONG - Hong Kong started incinerating its nearly 30-ton stockpile of confiscated ivory on Thursday to show it's serious about cracking down on an illegal wildlife trade that is devastating Africa's elephant population.

Authorities destroyed the first batch by burning a metric ton of elephant tusks and carved ivory figurines and bracelets in a rotary kiln.

Destroying the 28-ton stockpile, which is one of the world's biggest, is expected to take until mid-2015. The fine dark grey ash left after incineration will be mixed with cement and lime and dumped in a landfill. About 1.6 tons of ivory will be kept for educational or scientific purposes.

The destruction follows similar initiatives in the past year by Belgium, France, China, the U.S. and the Philippines.

Hong Kong's stockpile has bulged as customs agents have intercepted a series of big shipments of smuggled ivory in recent years. The busts highlight the former British colony's role as a transshipment hub for ivory shipped from Africa to mainland China, where demand is growing because of rising incomes.

Ivory can fetch up to $2,400 a kilogram in China, according to the International Fund for Animal Welfare, which estimates poachers kill 35,000 elephants a year for their tusks, risking the animal's extinction in the wild.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Sudden Surge: Flood of 2014
Opportunity Magazine — The Bakken
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media