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NASA: Space station loses 1 of 8 power channels; backup working and no impact to astronauts

The SpaceX Dragon capsule berths at the International Space Station Sunday April 20, 2014, as photographed by the Expedition 39 crew members onboard the orbital outpost.

NASA / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge Image

The SpaceX Dragon capsule berths at the International Space Station Sunday April 20, 2014, as photographed by the Expedition 39 crew members onboard the orbital outpost.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The International Space Station is down one power channel because of an electrical malfunction. But NASA says everyone and everything is safe up there.

Mission Control says one of eight power channels went down Thursday because of an apparent trip in an electrical switch. Most of the station systems that depend on that power line immediately switched to a backup. Within an hour, flight controllers moved the remaining systems to the backup power channel.

NASA is trying to determine what happened and how to fix it. Meanwhile, all space station systems are operating normally.

Officials say the problem will not affect Tuesday's departure by three of the six astronauts. An American, Japanese and Russian will return to Earth in a Soyuz capsule following a half-year mission.


Live streaming video by Ustream

About the video: The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) experiment aboard the ISS was activated April 30, 2014. Video from several cameras is transmitted back to earth and streamed live on this channel. Views typically sequence though the different cameras. Between camera switches, a gray and then black color slate will briefly appear. Since the ISS is in darkness during part of each orbit, the images will be dark at those times. During periods of loss of signal with the ground or when HDEV is not operating, a gray color slate or previously recorded video may be seen. Review the current location of the ISS.

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