Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Lifestyles
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Report: More than 14.5 million in US have survived cancer; lung cancer one of deadliest types

CHICAGO - It's National Cancer Survivors Day, and chances are good that you know at least one of them.

Cancer survivors now number more than 14.5 million in the United States and are expected to grow to 19 million over the next decade, a new report finds. More cancers are cured, more people are living longer with the disease and people are living longer in general, which boosts the number of cases and survivors because the risk of developing cancer rises with age.

"They're living longer and we hope with better quality of life," said Dr. Patricia Ganz of the University of California, Los Angeles, whose research focuses on quality-of-life issues.

The American Cancer Society's report was released Sunday during the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the world's largest group of specialists who treat the disease.

Here are five things to know about cancer:

GENDER'S INFLUENCE

Survival varies by gender and cancer type. For male survivors, the most common cancers they faced were prostate, followed by colorectal and melanoma. For female survivors, the most common types were breast cancer, followed by uterine and colorectal.

DIAGNOSIS TIMING

Two-thirds of today's cancer survivors were diagnosed at least five years ago, and 15 per cent were diagnosed 20 or more years ago.

LONG LIVES

About half of cancer survivors are 70 or older. Only 5 per cent are under age 40.

LUNG CANCER SURVIVAL POOR

Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in men and women, but it is so deadly that it ranks No. 8 among survivors. That may change with promising treatments on the horizon, said Gwen Darien, head of programs and services for Cancer Support Community, a nationwide support group.

The deadly skin cancer melanoma has seen a flurry of new treatments in recent years, and "that gives us hope for some of the other cancers where survival has not improved as much," she said.

THE ROAD AHEAD

Cancer survivors are at greater risk of second cancers and need to be monitored closely for the rest of their lives. Darien is an example — she survived non-Hodgkins lymphoma 21 years ago and now is being treated for breast cancer.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media