Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Lifestyles
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

US, China take small steps toward fighting climate change, but differ on global plan

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the joint opening session of the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue known as the

Enlarge Image

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the joint opening session of the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue known as the "S&ED" at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China Wednesday, July 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Jim Bourg, Pool)

BEIJING, China - China and the United States took small steps toward their shared goal of fighting climate change on Wednesday, but the world's No. 1 and No. 2 carbon emitters remain significantly apart over a wider global plan to cut emissions.

China's chief climate official Xie Zhenhua said China should not be subject to the same rules for greenhouse gas emissions as the United States and other rich countries, signalling that Beijing will oppose any attempt to impose them at next year's world climate conference.

"We are in different development stages, we have different historical responsibilities and we have different capacities," Xie told reporters.

The U.S. special envoy Todd Stern said Washington favours every country deciding what it is capable of doing, instead of being categorized either as a developed country or a developing country in deciding how much a country should contribute to reduce climate change.

Asked how receptive the Chinese were to this idea, Stern said: "It's one of those conversations that just goes on and on, doesn't stop."

For years, the United States and China have been at odds over how much each country should contribute to reducing climate change. China insists as a developing country it shouldn't be held to the same stringent emissions caps as the rich world. The U.S. says that means failing to sufficiently address the problem given that China has significantly surpassed the U.S. as the world's biggest emitter of carbon dioxide, the heat-trapping gas that is a byproduct of burning coal, oil and gas.

Climate change activists complain that both countries have failed to take adequate steps to curb emissions. President Barack Obama recently announced a plan to cut by 30 per cent greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, but set a deadline of 2030, by which time researchers say the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will already have caused drastic changes to the planet.

Xie and Stern made their remarks as Chinese and American officials — led by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew — are meeting in Beijing for annual strategic and economic talks that aim to forge a more co-operative relationship between the world's two largest economies.

The difference on the global plan aside, the two countries announced Wednesday eight joint projects aimed at capturing and storing carbon, and setting up more efficient energy grids.

They also agreed to stronger fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks and to study gas use in industrial boilers.

__

AP writer Bradley Klapper contributed to this report.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media