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When do American liberals and tea partiers think alike? When they're angry at the NSA

FILE - In this June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, in Hong Kong. Compared with their more moderate Republican or Democratic peers, tea party supporters and liberals are significantly more likely to oppose the collection of millions of ordinary citizens’ telephone and Internet data, an Associated Press-GfK poll shows. By a 2-to-1 margin, both tea party supporters and liberals say the government should put protecting citizens’ rights and freedoms ahead of protecting them from terrorists. (AP Photo/The Guardian, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, File)

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FILE - In this June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, in Hong Kong. Compared with their more moderate Republican or Democratic peers, tea party supporters and liberals are significantly more likely to oppose the collection of millions of ordinary citizens’ telephone and Internet data, an Associated Press-GfK poll shows. By a 2-to-1 margin, both tea party supporters and liberals say the government should put protecting citizens’ rights and freedoms ahead of protecting them from terrorists. (AP Photo/The Guardian, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, File)

WASHINGTON - Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency are uniting an unlikely combination — tea partiers and liberals.

They're on opposite sides of the political divide. But people to the right and left of mainstream America are sounding a lot alike on this issue.

An Associated Press-GfK poll shows that when compared with moderate Republicans or Democrats, tea party supporters and liberals are significantly more likely to oppose sweeping collection of people's telephone and Internet data.

President Barack Obama is a point of division in the anti-surveillance coalition.

Eight in 10 tea partiers dislike how he's handled the issue. Only about half of liberals disapprove.

By a 2-to-1 margin, tea-party supporters and liberals say the government should put protecting citizens' rights and freedoms ahead of protecting them from terrorists.

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