Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

Cold weather forces farmers to chill out

Hurry up and wait might be the theme of this year’s spring for Manitoba producers eager to start working their land.

"Patience is the key," said Elmer Kaskiw, a farm production adviser with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development in Minnedosa.

Cold weather coupled with extended bouts of precipitation have left fields a cold and muddy mess.

Most producers, according to Kaskiw, haven’t changed their cropping rotations and plans yet, although if the cool temperatures persist, it may force some farmers to re-evaluate what crop they are seeding.

"The important thing for producers is that they don’t want to compromise the seeding operation by getting in the fields too early and seeding when it is too wet or too cold," he said.

"You’ll often end up paying for those compromises down the road with poor emergence and problems that will persist throughout the growing season and result in lower yields."

Kaskiw expects fields to dry up quickly once the frost comes out of the ground.

He said frost from an unseasonably cold winter is keeping soil temperatures low.

Corn may be the first crop on the chopping block if the cool temperatures persists.

As a large grain, corn requires a high number of heat units with an extended growing season compared to other crops.

According to meteorologists with AccuWeather.com, the cool weather pattern will dominate Westman throughout the summer.

The below seasonal normal temperatures are a result of a dip in the jetstream across Central and Eastern Canada.

One plus for producers is the patterns are supposed to result in less severe weather throughout the summer.

Kaskiw said most producers like to have corn planted by May 18, while soybeans follow, usually planted the next week.

"There’s not a lot of panic setting in yet for producers," Kaskiw said. "Most producers are well equipped and prepared that they can get the crop seeded in a relatively short period of time."

» ctweed@brandonsun.com

» Twitter: @CharlesTweed

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition May 15, 2014

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Hurry up and wait might be the theme of this year’s spring for Manitoba producers eager to start working their land.

"Patience is the key," said Elmer Kaskiw, a farm production adviser with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development in Minnedosa.

Please subscribe to view full article.

Already subscribed? Login to view full article.

Not yet a subscriber? Click here to sign up

Hurry up and wait might be the theme of this year’s spring for Manitoba producers eager to start working their land.

"Patience is the key," said Elmer Kaskiw, a farm production adviser with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development in Minnedosa.

Subscription required to view full article.

A subscription to the Brandon Sun Newspaper is required to view this article. Please update your user information if you are already a newspaper subscriber.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Election 2014
Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media