Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

Company marks trucker's 50 years on the road

Leo Lafrance (left) was honoured at Quintaine’s company Christmas party when the trucker, who has been with the company for 50 years, was given a new truck. Lafrance is pictured with Pete Quintaine (middle) and Jim Quintaine, who now runs the livestock brokerage and trucking business.

Enlarge Image

Leo Lafrance (left) was honoured at Quintaine’s company Christmas party when the trucker, who has been with the company for 50 years, was given a new truck. Lafrance is pictured with Pete Quintaine (middle) and Jim Quintaine, who now runs the livestock brokerage and trucking business. (CHARLES TWEED/BRANDON SUN)

When Leo Lafrance received his gift from Jim Quintaine at the company Christmas party, he was speechless — in fact, he still doesn’t have the words to describe what he felt.

On Friday, Quintaine, owner of P. Quintaine and Son and J. Quintaine and Son, presented Lafrance with a plaque that displayed one of the first trucks he drove for the livestock brokerage and trucking company — a 1964 B-Model Mack — and his current truck — a Freightliner. He also told Lafrance, who has worked for the company for 50 years, that he’d be getting a brand new personal truck of his choice as a token of the company’s appreciation for all he’s done.

"I didn’t even know about it," said an emotional Lafrance. "They caught me off guard. I didn’t believe it at the time and I still don’t know what to say."

On Saturday, the pair were headed to the Keystone Centre to look at trucks at Murray’s Year End Indoor Classic Sale. But Lafrance might have had other designs on which truck he wanted.

"I’ve got my eye on the boss’ truck," Lafrance joked.

Lafrance, a member of the Manitoba Trucking Association’s Million Mile Club, proudly wears a black jacket, which reads "6,000,000 Miles" — and those are just the miles that have been recorded. And maybe more impressive is that all those miles have been spent with one company.

"It’s been a pleasure to work here and like everywhere you have to take some bad with the good, but there has always been more good than bad," Lafrance said.

He credits his longevity to the fact that he’s always been close friends with the owners, but never overstepped his position on the business side of things.

"It is rare that you see an employee that works for the boss and is also a friend and it didn’t make it harder," Lafrance said about being friends with Pete Quintaine, who originally started the company in Pilot Mound with a 1938 Ford one-ton truck, or his son Jim. "There was always a moment of understanding that he was the boss, no matter how. When we went for breakfast we went as friends and when we talked we talked as friends. Leave work at work and we’ve always had a good understanding and there’s never been a problem."

Lafrance said in his 50 years with the company he’s never thought about leaving to pursue another career.

"The grass isn’t always greener on the other side and when your satisfied with a place that is well run, you never want to change," Lafrance said.

And just as the business has played an integral part in Lafrance’s life, Jim Quintaine thought it was equally as important to recognize an employee that has played a role in the company’s success.

"It was important to our company to recognize him because we feel if we go to hire employees people can see that employees stay with us," Jim Quintaine said. "We can’t be too bad to work for and it helps when you hire people that they feel that they are not a number, that they are part of the team."

Quintaine said Lafrance cares about each load of livestock he delivers like they were his own. And stressed the importance of having good drivers, who often are the company’s liaison between themselves and the buyers.

"Our drivers are our ambassadors," Quintaine said. "If you see a Quintaine truck, you can be assured it’s not a no-account kid driving it and that’s what we like."

» ctweed@brandonsun.com

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition December 24, 2012

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article is currently rated an average of 5 out of 5 (1 votes).
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

When Leo Lafrance received his gift from Jim Quintaine at the company Christmas party, he was speechless — in fact, he still doesn’t have the words to describe what he felt.

On Friday, Quintaine, owner of P. Quintaine and Son and J. Quintaine and Son, presented Lafrance with a plaque that displayed one of the first trucks he drove for the livestock brokerage and trucking company — a 1964 B-Model Mack — and his current truck — a Freightliner. He also told Lafrance, who has worked for the company for 50 years, that he’d be getting a brand new personal truck of his choice as a token of the company’s appreciation for all he’s done.

Please subscribe to view full article.

Already subscribed? Login to view full article.

Not yet a subscriber? Click here to sign up

When Leo Lafrance received his gift from Jim Quintaine at the company Christmas party, he was speechless — in fact, he still doesn’t have the words to describe what he felt.

On Friday, Quintaine, owner of P. Quintaine and Son and J. Quintaine and Son, presented Lafrance with a plaque that displayed one of the first trucks he drove for the livestock brokerage and trucking company — a 1964 B-Model Mack — and his current truck — a Freightliner. He also told Lafrance, who has worked for the company for 50 years, that he’d be getting a brand new personal truck of his choice as a token of the company’s appreciation for all he’s done.

Subscription required to view full article.

A subscription to the Brandon Sun Newspaper is required to view this article. Please update your user information if you are already a newspaper subscriber.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Election 2014
Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media