Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

First Nations not sharing salaries may lose funding

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation Chief Vince Tacan, seen here during an interview in June, says he plans to comply with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act.

TIM SMITH/BRANDON SUN Enlarge Image

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation Chief Vince Tacan, seen here during an interview in June, says he plans to comply with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act.

First Nations have until the end of November to comply with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, or they could risk losing their government funding.

The deadline for all 633 of Canada’s First Nations to comply was July 29, and "if there is no resolution" the federal government can withhold funding, according to Erica Meekes, press secretary in the office of Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt.

BY THE NUMBERSThis is a roundup of chief and council salaries for the year ending March 31, 2014 for nearby First Nations that have complied with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act as of Wednesday afternoon.Gambler First NationChief David Ledoux $20,163Coun. Nathan Tanner $17,207Coun. Kelly Tanner $12,830Coun. Roy Vermette $5,141Keeseekoowenin First NationChief James Plewak $62,000Coun. Marjorie Blackbird $39,500Coun. Barry Bone $47,500Coun. Bryan Bone $37,500Coun. Yolanda Williams $38,500Rolling River First NationChief Morris Shannacappo $51,511Coun. Brent Wilson $55,400Coun. Gilbert Shorting $62,076Coun. Michael McKay $50,100» Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

"Bands which failed to comply by the deadline ... will receive several formal reminders," Meekes told the Sun via email. "After 120 calendar days, if there is no resolution, for bands that are refusing to comply with the law, the government will take action according to the provisions of the law, which could include withholding of funding."

First Nations that refuse to post their financial statements online could also be subject to a court order forcing them to comply.

Under the act, First Nations — defined as Indian bands under the Indian Act — must disclose chief and council salaries, other forms of remuneration, travel expenses as well as finances from band-owned business and consolidated financial audits of First Nations bands.

The new law also allows the government to post the information on the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada website.

As of Wednesday evening, four out of seven nearby First Nations had yet to comply with the act. Those include Birdtail Sioux First Nation, Canupawakpa Dakota First Nation, Waywayseecappo First Nation and Sioux Valley Dakota Nation.

Representatives from each community cited finalizing financial documents and finishing audits as reasons behind the holdup. However, they all said they plan to comply with the new law.

Sioux Valley Chief Vince Tacan said he’s not opposed to the transparency act and hopes to have their audit completed soon.

"It’s one step in the business that we need to do and in our case there’s going to be a little more onus on us as a First Nation that’s in self-government," Tacan said.

Sioux Valley officially entered self-government last month and according to AANDC’s website, the transparency act doesn’t apply to self-governing First Nations "because accountability and transparency measures are already built into their agreements."

However, Tacan said they still plan to comply with the new law.

"We’re going to do it as a matter of information sharing," he said. "It’s just good business to do that."

Tacan said he earns $65,000 a year and five council members earn $45,000 each annually, all of which exclude travel expenses.

He said their salaries haven’t changed for at least the past five years.

"Those are the numbers, I know that for sure those won’t change," he said.

"We’ve been pretty transparent about sharing that information."

Tacan said they host quarterly meetings, post information on their website and release written reports to keep members up-to-date on the community’s finances.

"We’re working on it. It’s not perfect but we’re struggling with new things as well, so we’re trying to figure out our communications and how we can get information out effectively."

» lenns@brandonsun.com

» Twitter: @LindseyEnns

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition August 7, 2014

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 1 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

Well I am First Nation and would like to know these kind of things. Specially when our own funding for our Social Assistance Benefits are being with held from the community! But funds for our leaders are spot on the dot every month.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

First Nations have until the end of November to comply with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, or they could risk losing their government funding.

The deadline for all 633 of Canada’s First Nations to comply was July 29, and "if there is no resolution" the federal government can withhold funding, according to Erica Meekes, press secretary in the office of Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt.

Please subscribe to view full article.

Already subscribed? Login to view full article.

Not yet a subscriber? Click here to sign up

First Nations have until the end of November to comply with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, or they could risk losing their government funding.

The deadline for all 633 of Canada’s First Nations to comply was July 29, and "if there is no resolution" the federal government can withhold funding, according to Erica Meekes, press secretary in the office of Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt.

Subscription required to view full article.

A subscription to the Brandon Sun Newspaper is required to view this article. Please update your user information if you are already a newspaper subscriber.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media