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Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

Mötley Crüe brings down the house

Lead singer Vince Neil and drummer Tommy Lee take centre stage during the Mötley Crüe concert at Westman Place in the Keystone Centre on Monday night.

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Lead singer Vince Neil and drummer Tommy Lee take centre stage during the Mötley Crüe concert at Westman Place in the Keystone Centre on Monday night. (COLIN CORNEAU/BRANDON SUN)

A long lineup threads its way to the Keystone Centre’s east entrance before the Mötley Crüe concert in Westman Place on Monday night.

Enlarge Image

A long lineup threads its way to the Keystone Centre’s east entrance before the Mötley Crüe concert in Westman Place on Monday night. (COLIN CORNEAU/BRANDON SUN)

Heavy metal veterans Motley Crüe take the stage at Westman Place in the Keystone Centre for a concert on Monday night.

Enlarge Image

Heavy metal veterans Motley Crüe take the stage at Westman Place in the Keystone Centre for a concert on Monday night. (COLIN CORNEAU/BRANDON SUN)

As the seconds ticked down on a giant clock, the crowd in Westman Place whipped itself into a frenzy waiting for Vince Neil, Nikki Sixx, Tommy Lee and Mick Mars to take the stage.

And when the kick and snare drum finally started to pound, the roof just about blew off the place as the sound of Mötley Crüe reverberated through the walls.

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"It was great and I’ve always been crazy about Mötley Crüe and I’ve read all their books and they’ve always been a group that I’ve loved," said Kristin Guild, who saw the band for the fourth time in concert, but first in Brandon.

While the show might have been slightly scaled down compared to their stadium shows, which includes a roller-coaster drum solo by Lee, it was still one of the largest stage shows ever in Westman Place.

Two gorgeous acrobats dazzled from the rooftop as they performed tricks that looked more like something from a Cirque du Soleil show —all part of a show that is equal parts music and theatrics.

The iconic band played all the classics to an enthusiastic crowd that was a cross-section of fans who grew up listening to the band in high school and high schoolers who wanted to take in a rock show.

Men — some wearing sleeveless Crüe shirts — and women — some barley wearing shirts — rocked the devil’s horns at the band who have transcended themselves into more than just musicians, but rather celebrities, TV stars and sex symbols.

"You can ask my husband, I have my binoculars and I tend to stare at (Sixx) for long periods of time," Guild said. "He’s just such an interesting, creative person."

She was also actively following the band members on Twitter through the show, as Lee had tweeted earlier in the day that there were backstage passes hidden somewhere in the arena.

"I’d like to meet them briefly and then leave," she joked, well aware of the band’s history with women backstage. "Some scary stuff occurs back there."

Kristal Robinson drove in from Virden to catch the show, something she said she couldn’t miss.

Sporting a homemade shirt with the number ‘6’ on the front and ‘Nikki’ written through it, she came ready to rock. She also still decided to purchase two T-shirts from the merchandise tables which retailed for between $40-$50.

"It wouldn’t have mattered if it was $85, I would have bought it. I would have bought two, I did buy two," she said. "They support us by coming here so we can support them by buying a T-shirt is the way I see it."

With seats on the west side of the arena, she had a perfect view into all of the action taking place on the stage.

"It was a way better show than Winnipeg because it’s smaller," she said referenceing a concert she saw the band play a long time ago.

Tickets for the show ranged from $65 to $100, one of the more expensive shows at the Keystone Centre, but fans proved the tickets were more than fairly priced, selling 4,010 tickets or 84 per cent capacity.

A cold beer ranged from $5.50 to $6.75 while liquor was $5.50 for a shot and $6.50 for a cooler.

If the show was a test to see what the Westman market would bear, fans passed with flying colours.

There was also beefed up security lined the front and sides of the stage after guitarist Mars, who is 62 and suffers from ankylosing spondylitis — a chronic form of arthritis — was knocked down by a crazed fan who ran on the stage in Estevan, Sask. on Saturday.

A Keystone Centre official said they brought in extra security for the show to ensure nothing like that happened here.

» ctweed@brandonsun.com

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition May 7, 2013

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As the seconds ticked down on a giant clock, the crowd in Westman Place whipped itself into a frenzy waiting for Vince Neil, Nikki Sixx, Tommy Lee and Mick Mars to take the stage.

And when the kick and snare drum finally started to pound, the roof just about blew off the place as the sound of Mötley Crüe reverberated through the walls.

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As the seconds ticked down on a giant clock, the crowd in Westman Place whipped itself into a frenzy waiting for Vince Neil, Nikki Sixx, Tommy Lee and Mick Mars to take the stage.

And when the kick and snare drum finally started to pound, the roof just about blew off the place as the sound of Mötley Crüe reverberated through the walls.

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