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Push for mobile pet care clinic continues

Fundraising efforts for a mobile pet care clinic to serve surrounding First Nations is still ongoing, according to Brandon’s Farran Munn.

Farran, who has taken the lead on the Pawsitive Communities Mobile Pet Care Clinic — a partnership between the Dakota Ojibway Police Service, Dakota Ojibway Tribal Council and Brandon Humane Society — said they still have “a ways to go” before reaching their $100,000 goal.

So far, the passionate group of animal lovers has raised nearly $10,000.

“Our efforts to get sponsors to simply donate the money hasn’t been as successful as we hoped it’d be,” Farran said adding they are currently in the process of applying for multiple grants and reaching out to local organizations. “We’re going to keep contacting people ... and we’re working on new ideas for fundraisers that we can do.”

Brandon Humane Society’s shelter manager and Farran’s aunt, Tracy Munn, said their idea of a trailer housing a clinic could travel to rural communities with limited access to animal care resources and offer spaying, neutering and vaccinations. Although the local humane society already offers low-cost spaying and neutering to nearby First Nations, a mobile clinic could help them cover more ground.

“They need the help,” Tracy said. “They don’t have animal control, they don’t have a city pound, they don’t have any vets where they are … and we take so many puppies off the reserves so we’re trying to fix it and prevent it.”

Helen Pompana, who has called Sioux Valley Dakota Nation home for nearly 16 years, has been running an animal rescue out of her home for a year and a half to help with the community’s animal overpopulation issues. Pompana said they are currently fostering nine cats and three dogs with help from Brandon’s humane society.

After getting their dog population under control a few years ago by moving several dogs to rescues all over Canada, Pompana said their cat population is now “exploding.”

“It’s been an issue for years,” she said. “We’re looking at a lot of people having a lot of cats right now and I can see this becoming an issue in the future.”

Tracy said animal overpopulation issues are often due to a lack of nearby resources. She added there are still some rural communities shooting animals as a form of animal control, something she hopes a mobile clinic would help prevent.

“No kid should have to grow up seeing that ... that is not the right answer,” she said. “Kids deserve to grow up knowing that their puppy is something they love and a companion.”

» lenns@brandonsun.com

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition March 20, 2014

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Fundraising efforts for a mobile pet care clinic to serve surrounding First Nations is still ongoing, according to Brandon’s Farran Munn.

Farran, who has taken the lead on the Pawsitive Communities Mobile Pet Care Clinic — a partnership between the Dakota Ojibway Police Service, Dakota Ojibway Tribal Council and Brandon Humane Society — said they still have “a ways to go” before reaching their $100,000 goal.

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Fundraising efforts for a mobile pet care clinic to serve surrounding First Nations is still ongoing, according to Brandon’s Farran Munn.

Farran, who has taken the lead on the Pawsitive Communities Mobile Pet Care Clinic — a partnership between the Dakota Ojibway Police Service, Dakota Ojibway Tribal Council and Brandon Humane Society — said they still have “a ways to go” before reaching their $100,000 goal.

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