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Warm weather yields above-average crops

A combine brings in a crop in the the Assiniboine River valley  on Thursday afternoon near Kemnay.

BRUCE BUMSTEAD/BRANDON SUN Enlarge Image

A combine brings in a crop in the the Assiniboine River valley on Thursday afternoon near Kemnay.

Farmers are basking in the warm temperatures and surging ahead with the harvest throughout Westman.

Yields for many crops are being reported as above average — a good balance to the reduction in grain prices.

Province-wide highlights from this week’s crop report include:

• Strong weather systems passed through several areas of Manitoba over the Labour Day long weekend. High winds, heavy rains and hail associated with the systems resulted in some crop damage, including lodging of crops, shattering of standing and swathed canola and cereal crops.

• Winter wheat harvest is nearing completion with generally above average yields and quality.

• Harvest of spring wheat, barley, oats and canola continues. Reported spring wheat yields range from 35 to 80 bushels per acre, barley 60 to 110 bushels per acre, oats 85 to 160 bushels per acre and canola 30 to 60 bushels per acre.

• Seeding of winter wheat has started in Manitoba.

Specific to the southwest region, the above-normal temperatures resulted in significant crop ripening and maturity throughout much of the area. Accompanying these warm and at times humid conditions were isolated and severe thunderstorms that resulted in localized heavy rainfall and hail that caused damage to matured crops in affected areas.

Early yield reports are indicating above-average barley and spring wheat yields with good quality and above average bushel weights. The winter cereal harvest is reporting average yields and quality.

Regrowth of tillers in lodged cereal crops continues to be problematic for many producers and is slowing harvest progress, while fusarium levels continue to be found at low levels.

Winter wheat seeding began late last week in the more southern portions of the region with seeding progress being delayed in central and northern regions due to the delayed harvest.

The majority of the canola crop ripened rapidly last week. Early yield reports are indicating average to above-average yields. Sclerotinia continues to be found at low levels with much of the premature ripening a result of blackleg.

Desiccation, swathing and harvest of field peas continues with generally above average yields reported, although there are some lower yields on fields that had a frequent history of field peas in rotation.

Corn and soybeans continue to benefit from the warmer temperatures and have seen crop maturities advance last week. Most corn crops are in the late blister and early milk stage of development with some of the earlier seeded fields just beginning to enter the dough stage.

Sunflowers are continuing to come out of flower with the majority of the crop in the wilting stage.

Insect activity last week was limited to grasshoppers with the highest numbers reported in eastern and central areas.

The second cut alfalfa harvest is 75 to 80 per cent complete with the remainder of the crop to be harvested after the first fall frost.

Pasture conditions are generally stable due to shorter day length and the resurgence in cool season grasses as a result of spotty showers.

Water levels in sloughs and dugouts are at 50 to 60 per cent of capacity in northern and central regions and 75 to 80 per cent of capacity in southern regions.

» Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition September 6, 2013

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Farmers are basking in the warm temperatures and surging ahead with the harvest throughout Westman.

Yields for many crops are being reported as above average — a good balance to the reduction in grain prices.

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Farmers are basking in the warm temperatures and surging ahead with the harvest throughout Westman.

Yields for many crops are being reported as above average — a good balance to the reduction in grain prices.

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