Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

DND examines reports and costs of improved 24-7 search-and-rescue response

Sgt. Steph Clavette watches as a rescue basket is lowered from a Canadian Forces Cormorant helicopter during search and rescue training by the Royal Canadian Air Force 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron at Chilliwack Airport in Chilliwack, B.C., on Friday February 28, 2014.

DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES Enlarge Image

Sgt. Steph Clavette watches as a rescue basket is lowered from a Canadian Forces Cormorant helicopter during search and rescue training by the Royal Canadian Air Force 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron at Chilliwack Airport in Chilliwack, B.C., on Friday February 28, 2014.

OTTAWA - National Defence is once again taking a look at establishing an around-the-clock 30-minute response time for Canada's search-and-rescue squadrons, an idea the air force has long dismissed as too costly and manpower-intensive.

Burton Winters is shown in a handout photo. The Labrador teen walked through blowing snow across the sea ice outside Makkovik, hanging on for 19 freezing kilometres for help that never came in 2012.

Enlarge Image

Burton Winters is shown in a handout photo. The Labrador teen walked through blowing snow across the sea ice outside Makkovik, hanging on for 19 freezing kilometres for help that never came in 2012. (CP)

The Harper government has been under pressure to address the issue ever since a critique last year by the auditor general and the high-profile death two years ago of a young boy in Labrador.

Two reports that examine search-and-rescue incidents and the cost of a 24-7 operation were recently delivered to the headquarters that oversees both domestic and out-of-country missions.

A Defence spokesman, Daniel Blouin, would not say what the studies have concluded or when a decision would be made on their findings.

The research builds on a 2008 air force study that rejected the higher level of alert as expensive and only marginally better than the existing framework in terms of saving lives.

In order to meet the around-the-clock posture, the military would need to add between nine and 11 extra crews to the rotations and buy extra aircraft — or reassign existing ones.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Sudden Surge: Flood of 2014
Opportunity Magazine — The Bakken
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media