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Saskatchewan soldier mistakenly buried with enemy makes final journey home

Law enforcement and members of the Patriot Guard Riders escort the casket of Army Pfc. Lawrence Samuel Gordon through downtown Casper, Wyo. on Sunday afternoon, Aug. 10, 2014. Gordon, who worked on a ranch outside Casper before enlisting to fight in World War II, was killed in action in France and buried as an unknown soldier. His remains were recently identified by DNA and are being returned to his hometown of Eastend, Saskatchewan, Canada. (AP Photo/Casper Star-Tribune, Alan Rogers) MANDATORY CREDIT

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Law enforcement and members of the Patriot Guard Riders escort the casket of Army Pfc. Lawrence Samuel Gordon through downtown Casper, Wyo. on Sunday afternoon, Aug. 10, 2014. Gordon, who worked on a ranch outside Casper before enlisting to fight in World War II, was killed in action in France and buried as an unknown soldier. His remains were recently identified by DNA and are being returned to his hometown of Eastend, Saskatchewan, Canada. (AP Photo/Casper Star-Tribune, Alan Rogers) MANDATORY CREDIT

EASTEND, Sask. - A Saskatchewan-born soldier was laid to rest Wednesday in his home province, 70 years to the day after he was killed in northern France during the Second World War.

Lawrence S. Gordon fought with U.S. forces, but his remains couldn't be accounted for after his death.

His nephew, Lawrence R. Gordon, discovered in 2000 that the remains were not interred where they should have been and later learned they had mistakenly been buried with German war dead.

DNA tests conducted earlier this year helped identify the fallen soldier.

They also allowed for repatriation of the remains to Canada and their burial in the community of Eastend, about 390 kilometres southwest of Regina.

"I had no idea whenever I pledged to my father that I would visit his (uncle's) grave sometime that I would have to find him and identify him first, and then bring him home so that he would have a grave that I could visit," Gordon said.

He added that the experience has been positive for him.

"It restores your faith in humanity when you see what people are willing to do for free, for principle."

(CKRM)

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