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Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

The Doctor Game -- Don't ignore this amazing video

I’ve just sent an email to my children urging them to watch an amazing, informative video and telling them to never, never forget what they’ve seen. The video was produced in New Zealand for "60 Minutes," the TV show. It demonstrates the incompetence and sheer arrogance of some physicians. A man’s life was at stake and close to ending. But fortunately, his son knew more than his doctors.

Allan Smith, a 57-year-old New Zealand farmer, was stricken with a severe form of the swine flu virus. He was desperately ill, unconscious and near death. His doctors wanted to remove life-support technology. But his son refused. He pleaded that his father be given large amounts of intravenous vitamin C. The doctors were reluctant, but agreed only after the family brought in their attorney.

The video shows X-rays of Smith’s clogged lungs gradually clearing after receiving intravenous vitamin C. He gained consciousness and eventually recovered. One would have thought that Smith’s escape from the jaws of death would have made an imprint on the minds of his physicians. But it never penetrated their skulls.

One doctor, interviewed by the media, argued the prescribed drugs finally worked, when they had obviously failed. Nor could he defend the fact that the doctors were about to let Smith die. He was unaware that in 1950, Dr. Frederick Klenner, a North Carolina doctor, proved that high doses of intravenous vitamin C could cure polio, measles, encephalitis and other viral diseases. It’s tragic that this scientific fact is unknown to 99.9 percent of doctors.

For the last couple of years I’ve written about Medi-C Plus, a powder containing high doses of vitamin C and lysine. This vitamin has shown that it can prevent, but also reverse, atherosclerosis blockage in coronary arteries and prevent heart attack and stroke.

Two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling explained years ago that animals make vitamin C and humans do not. Vitamin C manufactures collagen, the glue that holds coronary cells together, and a lack of it triggers heart attacks.

Now, Dr. Sydney Bush, an English researcher, has proven by arterial photographs that this combination restores blocked vessels to normal. Photos don’t lie.

So what has happened with this scientific finding? It continues to collect dust, while cardiologists who should know better continue to ignore this revolutionary discovery. So do distinguished medical journals.

For instance, I have asked the editors of the Canadian Medical Association Journal to release this information to Canadian doctors. But my request goes unanswered. So much for the power of the press!

What happened in New Zealand is happening here. But new ideas in medicine have always found deaf ears. Today, doctors have been so brainwashed by pharmaceutical dollars that they blindly accept that cholesterol-lowering drugs are the be-all-and-end-all to prevent heart attack. They turn a blind eye to an inexpensive, safe and effective remedy like Medi-C Plus to eliminate coronary attack, stroke and other cardiovascular problems.

I’ve been subjected before to severe criticism when tackling controversial issues. But in recent months I’ve visited several parts of Canada, talking about this discovery. I’ve written about Medi-C Plus in my column and been on radio and TV. But, unlike other issues, no doctor has challenged this research! The fact is it cannot be challenged.

Since I’m not your doctor, I can’t tell you what to do. But I believe this natural remedy, without the use of cholesterol-lowering drugs, saved my life following a heart attack 15 years ago. I bet my life on it.

Medi-C Plus is available in powder or capsules in health food stores in Canada. The dose is one scoop with breakfast and dinner. But after a heart attack or stroke, three scoops a day are needed. If I had my life to live over, I’d start taking it as soon as I could afford it.

But don’t just believe me about the miracle of vitamin C. Rather, become an educated medical consumer. Dr. Frederick Klenner’s work is available on the Internet for all to read. You can also see the New Zealand video on YouTube.

» Dr. Gifford-Jones is a graduate of The University of Toronto and The Harvard Medical School. He took post-graduate training in surgery at the Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, McGill University in Montreal and Harvard. During his medical training he has been a family doctor, hotel doctor and ship's surgeon. His medical column is published by 70 Canadian newspapers, several in the U.S. and the Epoch Times which has editions in a number of European countries.

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition October 19, 2013

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I’ve just sent an email to my children urging them to watch an amazing, informative video and telling them to never, never forget what they’ve seen. The video was produced in New Zealand for "60 Minutes," the TV show. It demonstrates the incompetence and sheer arrogance of some physicians. A man’s life was at stake and close to ending. But fortunately, his son knew more than his doctors.

Allan Smith, a 57-year-old New Zealand farmer, was stricken with a severe form of the swine flu virus. He was desperately ill, unconscious and near death. His doctors wanted to remove life-support technology. But his son refused. He pleaded that his father be given large amounts of intravenous vitamin C. The doctors were reluctant, but agreed only after the family brought in their attorney.

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I’ve just sent an email to my children urging them to watch an amazing, informative video and telling them to never, never forget what they’ve seen. The video was produced in New Zealand for "60 Minutes," the TV show. It demonstrates the incompetence and sheer arrogance of some physicians. A man’s life was at stake and close to ending. But fortunately, his son knew more than his doctors.

Allan Smith, a 57-year-old New Zealand farmer, was stricken with a severe form of the swine flu virus. He was desperately ill, unconscious and near death. His doctors wanted to remove life-support technology. But his son refused. He pleaded that his father be given large amounts of intravenous vitamin C. The doctors were reluctant, but agreed only after the family brought in their attorney.

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