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Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

The Doctor Game -- This week, monumental photos to save your life

Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII, had the misfortune of losing her head. Fortunately, the rest of us still have ours. That’s fortunate because doctors are increasingly using the eye to diagnose generalized diseases. In fact, early detection of problems through the eye can prevent heart attack, stroke and save legs from amputation. Today, dramatic photos, just posted on my website, may save millions of lives.

The human body has 60,000 miles of arteries and veins, the same length as walking twice around the world. But there’s only one place where we can see blood vessels, in the retina, at the back of the eye, just a square centimeter in size.

Dr. David Ingvoldstad, a U.S. ophthalmologist and authority on retinal disease, says it’s not necessary to use invasive procedures to diagnose some generalized chronic health problems. The clue is what doctors see when examining the retina.

For instance, a retinal examination may detect small clots in tiny blood vessels. This indicates a stroke may occur if a larger clot blocks blood supply to the brain. Or the detection of inflammation of the optic nerve along with decreased vision can point to multiple sclerosis. And, on rare occasions, increased pressure on the optic nerve can diagnose brain cancer.

But the major sign that eye doctors look for is atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of arteries) associated with aging and particularly with diabetes. Half of diabetes patients die of heart attack. Others suffer from strokes, kidney failure, blindness or lose legs due to poor blood circulation through narrowed arteries.

There is a way to prevent these disastrous complications. But it is like crying in the wilderness to get the medical profession to accept a vital fact. High doses of vitamin C and lysine can both prevent and reverse atherosclerotic blocked arteries.

For years, cardiologists have not listened to Dr .Linus Pauling, who claimed that humans develop atherosclerosis and heart attack because, unlike animals, they are unable to produce vitamin C. This vitamin is needed for the manufacture of collagen, the glue that holds coronary cells together.

Just as mortar between bricks develops cracks if it’s defective, so does collagen. These microscopic cracks in coronary arteries set the stage for the formation of fat-laden cholesterol deposits that cause blockage and death. In effect, no crack, no blockage and no death.

It’s even more frustrating that cardiologists have ignored Dr. Sydney Bush, an English researcher. His historic photos of arteries on my website are undeniable. They prove vitamin C plus lysine acts as a medical Drano to unblock arteries. Photos don’t lie.

Sixteen years ago, following a heart attack, cardiologists said I would die when I refused to take cholesterol-lowering drugs (CLDs). Rather, I bet my life on natural science as I did not want to accept the risk of CLDs.

This meant that for many years I’ve had to swallow a ton of vitamin C and lysine pills, and I got tired of it. Fortunately, Preferred Nutrition has produced a combination powder called Medi-C Plus. It is now available in health food stores.

I admit that if I had not been a medical journalist and not met Pauling I would have taken my cardiologist’s advice and agreed to CLDs. Now 16 years later at 90 years of age, I know this would not have been the right decision.

It’s ironic that much of the public can see and accept the scientific logic behind this research, but it is appalling that doctors refuse to consider it. I believe the hundreds of millions of dollars spent on advertising CLDs has brain-washed them.

Don’t miss the photos on my website docgiff.com and show them to your doctor. Fortunately, you don’t have to be a doctor to see that arteries of patients treated with vitamin C and lysine are healthier and larger, carrying more blood to the heart. This is a monumental finding and represents preventive medicine at its best.

Remember that this combination provides not only increased circulation to coronary arteries, but benefits the other thousands of miles of arteries in the body. This means less blindness, amputations, kidney failure and stroke.

» Dr. Gifford-Jones is a graduate of The University of Toronto and The Harvard Medical School. He took post-graduate training in surgery at the Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, McGill University in Montreal and Harvard. During his medical training he has been a family doctor, hotel doctor and ship’s surgeon. His medical column is published by 70 Canadian newspapers, several in the U.S. and the Epoch Times which has editions in a number of European countries.

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition March 8, 2014

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Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII, had the misfortune of losing her head. Fortunately, the rest of us still have ours. That’s fortunate because doctors are increasingly using the eye to diagnose generalized diseases. In fact, early detection of problems through the eye can prevent heart attack, stroke and save legs from amputation. Today, dramatic photos, just posted on my website, may save millions of lives.

The human body has 60,000 miles of arteries and veins, the same length as walking twice around the world. But there’s only one place where we can see blood vessels, in the retina, at the back of the eye, just a square centimeter in size.

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Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII, had the misfortune of losing her head. Fortunately, the rest of us still have ours. That’s fortunate because doctors are increasingly using the eye to diagnose generalized diseases. In fact, early detection of problems through the eye can prevent heart attack, stroke and save legs from amputation. Today, dramatic photos, just posted on my website, may save millions of lives.

The human body has 60,000 miles of arteries and veins, the same length as walking twice around the world. But there’s only one place where we can see blood vessels, in the retina, at the back of the eye, just a square centimeter in size.

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