Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Opinion
Classified Sites

Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

Columnist's views founded on a fiction

I read with interest the column by Brandon University student Natalie Bohrn — The Bohrn Identity— that appeared in the April 13 edition of the Brandon Sun entitled “Sugary drinks don’t always taste sweet.”

While Ms. Bohrn is to be commended for her concerns about environmental sustainability and healthy living, the foundation of her views about banning the sale of bottled water and other bottled beverages on campus is founded on a fiction about both.

There isn’t a single item in her university’s cafeteria that features either the carbon footprint or health benefits that bottled water does, yet it is no longer sold there. The Canadian beverage industry has supplied, at its cost, Recycle Everywhere bin infrastructure across the campus and, in fact, throughout the municipality to collect beverage containers in public spaces. Non-alcoholic beverage containers have the highest recycling rate of any recyclable item sold in Brandon.

Now other bottled beverages are on Ms. Bohrn’s radar, even though subject matter experts like Dr. Barry Popkin, one of the world’s foremost authorities on dietary intake and obesity, recommends moderation over elimination of caloric beverages. No mention is made by Ms. Bohrn of sweetened juices, specialty coffees or dairy products — all of which contain more calories than the beverages she has cited.

None of these beverages contain as many calories as campus favourites like hamburgers, pizza or french fries. Their carbon footprints are higher than bottled beverages and their packaging typically isn’t recyclable or can’t be recycled when it is contaminated by food waste — all of which is not to suggest that any of these items be banned from sale.

Every one of these foods and beverages is either provincially or federally regulated. In moderation, all of these foods and beverages contribute to healthy living.

All banning does is force students and staff to go off-campus to buy what they want. As has been proven at the cities of Toronto and Niagara Falls when bottled water bans were enacted there, the municipal cafeteria suffered financially for it. Their customers were inconvenienced but no more healthy, environmentally or otherwise.

Brandon University students and staff have a fundamental right to choose the legal, federally regulated beverage of their choice. All they need is regular public education about what constitutes the best food and beverage choices to make each day — and why.

John B. Challinor

Director of corporate affairs

Nestlé Waters Canada

Guelph, Ont.

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition April 16, 2013

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 2 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

Everything can be solved by everyone making the correct personal choice. Right?

Surely someone agrees or disagrees with such a startling opinion?

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

I read with interest the column by Brandon University student Natalie Bohrn — The Bohrn Identity— that appeared in the April 13 edition of the Brandon Sun entitled “Sugary drinks don’t always taste sweet.”

While Ms. Bohrn is to be commended for her concerns about environmental sustainability and healthy living, the foundation of her views about banning the sale of bottled water and other bottled beverages on campus is founded on a fiction about both.

Please subscribe to view full article.

Already subscribed? Login to view full article.

Not yet a subscriber? Click here to sign up

I read with interest the column by Brandon University student Natalie Bohrn — The Bohrn Identity— that appeared in the April 13 edition of the Brandon Sun entitled “Sugary drinks don’t always taste sweet.”

While Ms. Bohrn is to be commended for her concerns about environmental sustainability and healthy living, the foundation of her views about banning the sale of bottled water and other bottled beverages on campus is founded on a fiction about both.

Subscription required to view full article.

A subscription to the Brandon Sun Newspaper is required to view this article. Please update your user information if you are already a newspaper subscriber.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Submit a Random Act of Kindness
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media