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Lake Winnipeg on threat award list

Yes, there’s more wrong with Lake Winnipeg than right, and when our elected officials, in this case, Conservation, allow the destruction of a lakeside marsh, it makes me wonder, what in blazes is wrong with our government, which professes to care about these waters.

There are a great many other contributors of pollutants that come into the 10th largest freshwater lake in the world. They come from Manitoba, west from the Rocky Mountains, Ontario and of course the U.S. via the Red River system.

But that should never deter Manitobans in doing our part and set an example of not to pollute, or remove or destroy natures water filters.

In June 2011, the premier of Manitoba made a statement that in the coming year (which would be 2012) there would be meetings at high levels with provinces and the U.S. to address water issues that contaminate Lake Winnipeg.

To date, the only action in that regard, and reported, is a short trip into the U.S., where the crowd did apparently agree, that they also have concerns about the condition of our lake.

What else has been done? Who knows.

It’s not a very nice award to be nominated for, that’s for sure, and “threatened” is not the appropriate word.

It is far beyond that. Lake Winnipeg is, and has been, under attack for the past couple of decades.

And if the government would just look in a mirror every now and then, it might come to the conclusion, that it is a very big part of the problem that is plaguing the health recovery of Lake Winnipeg.

John Fefchak

Virden

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition January 26, 2013

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Yes, there’s more wrong with Lake Winnipeg than right, and when our elected officials, in this case, Conservation, allow the destruction of a lakeside marsh, it makes me wonder, what in blazes is wrong with our government, which professes to care about these waters.

There are a great many other contributors of pollutants that come into the 10th largest freshwater lake in the world. They come from Manitoba, west from the Rocky Mountains, Ontario and of course the U.S. via the Red River system.

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Yes, there’s more wrong with Lake Winnipeg than right, and when our elected officials, in this case, Conservation, allow the destruction of a lakeside marsh, it makes me wonder, what in blazes is wrong with our government, which professes to care about these waters.

There are a great many other contributors of pollutants that come into the 10th largest freshwater lake in the world. They come from Manitoba, west from the Rocky Mountains, Ontario and of course the U.S. via the Red River system.

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