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Brandon Sun - PRINT EDITION

We have to stop taking water for granted

Diane Nelson doesn't drink Brandon’s tap water anymore and she tells us why. (“More On Our ‘Unhealthy’ Tap Water,” Brandon Sun, March 22)

Her story, as well as the research information provided by biology Prof. Bill Paton, pretty well, says it all.

To me, it is a misfortune that we, as humans, pollute and poison what we all must have to nourish our bodies and survive: Water.

As I see it, part of the problem is that our economy, our governments and our society do not account for the social, the health and the environmental consequences that are being experienced and inflicted upon communities and our water sources.

The rivers of yesterday (in Manitoba) provided a means of transportation, a source of food and water to quench one’s needs.

Today, for the most part, those rivers and creeks are regarded as handy, open air sewers (some place to discard leftovers) and people seem to accept that expensive water treatment plants will take care of our needs for drinking. However, as recognized by Paton, as time has passed the deterioration of the Assiniboine waters have steadily worsened.

That makes me wonder, if treatment plants are able to cope with this, and what are the future repercussions to human health, as the disinfection methods have to be increased and strengthened to provide a form of drinkable water.

How long can mankind continue to survive, as he continues to pollute and devastate what we all must have to live?

JOHN FEFCHAK

Virden

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition March 29, 2014

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Go, Mr. Fefchak, go!

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Diane Nelson doesn't drink Brandon’s tap water anymore and she tells us why. (“More On Our ‘Unhealthy’ Tap Water,” Brandon Sun, March 22)

Her story, as well as the research information provided by biology Prof. Bill Paton, pretty well, says it all.

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Diane Nelson doesn't drink Brandon’s tap water anymore and she tells us why. (“More On Our ‘Unhealthy’ Tap Water,” Brandon Sun, March 22)

Her story, as well as the research information provided by biology Prof. Bill Paton, pretty well, says it all.

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