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Sound Off -- Jan.26, 2013

The naming game

With the announcement of a new casino in Winnipeg, it is again clear that the rules for Brandon and Winnipeg are different. After years of being told that there is no possibility of a casino in Brandon that is not First Nations-owned, a “gaming centre” has been announced, to be owned by True North Enterprises and run by Manitoba Lotteries. On a Winnipeg radio station, a representative of the Lotteries Commission was repeatedly asked why this “gaming centre” is not considered a casino and the only answer that she could give was: “We are branding it a gaming centre.” This sounds like doublespeak designed to sidestep their previously stated policy.

For a job well done

It is about time we hear about teachers doing a good job. Peter, thanks for all you do. (Kevin, Mike and Jonesy). Thanks for being tough.

Show us the money

There seem to be a lot of rumours floating around town regarding the Lieutenant Governor’s Winter Festival and where the profits from the various pavilions end up, particularly some of the more successful pavilions like the English Pavilion. Perhaps these rumours could be put to rest by the pavilions making their financial statements from the past couple of years public. Until it has been determined where the profits end up, festival goers and volunteers might want to be somewhat selective in which pavilions they support this year.

Let’s all learn the Native treaties

This paper is showing a gentleman teaching teachers the native treaties of yesterday. Why not print them one by one in the Brandon Sun so that we can all read them and understand them from a general public’s point of view. I am sure that they would be very interesting reading.

Some things never change

In the Jan. 21 Brandon Sun’s Looking Back mentioned how many bands were not managed properly and were put in “remedial management plans” and this was 10 years ago ... so does this not show the bands have trouble managing funding still to this day? Yet let’s have a hunger strike and Idle No More activities so that no one sees these problems. I am a band member where the band is in co-management. Does this mean when out of co-management it’s back to the same old activities? So why do these chiefs have a say in treaty process — they are the only ones taking our people into poverty. Can I be like the settlers where they got 160 acres to start a living?

Time to revisit the treaties

Before we go any further on this Idle No More movement, maybe people should go on the Internet and learn something. Such as, about 15,000 years ago, people from Northeast Asia, crossed the land/ice bridge to North America. They are immigrants, the same as you and myself. They were vicious and fought one another, slavery was rife among the First Nation, Europeans came over and freed the slaves. We didn’t steal their land, we invaded and conquered them, the same has gone on world-wide for thousands of years. People should also read the original treaties. First Nations has received many, many times more than agreed to in the treaties. It’s time the old treaties were done away with and reserves were shut down.

Build it and they will come

I wish the Keystone Centre could learn a lesson from what they are doing out in Moose Jaw with the new Mosaic Place. They are having a ton of concerts. From what I hear they are selling really well. I think the Sun should do a story on the Mosaic Place in comparison to the Keystone Centre.

Republished from the Brandon Sun print edition January 26, 2013

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The naming game

With the announcement of a new casino in Winnipeg, it is again clear that the rules for Brandon and Winnipeg are different. After years of being told that there is no possibility of a casino in Brandon that is not First Nations-owned, a “gaming centre” has been announced, to be owned by True North Enterprises and run by Manitoba Lotteries. On a Winnipeg radio station, a representative of the Lotteries Commission was repeatedly asked why this “gaming centre” is not considered a casino and the only answer that she could give was: “We are branding it a gaming centre.” This sounds like doublespeak designed to sidestep their previously stated policy.

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The naming game

With the announcement of a new casino in Winnipeg, it is again clear that the rules for Brandon and Winnipeg are different. After years of being told that there is no possibility of a casino in Brandon that is not First Nations-owned, a “gaming centre” has been announced, to be owned by True North Enterprises and run by Manitoba Lotteries. On a Winnipeg radio station, a representative of the Lotteries Commission was repeatedly asked why this “gaming centre” is not considered a casino and the only answer that she could give was: “We are branding it a gaming centre.” This sounds like doublespeak designed to sidestep their previously stated policy.

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