Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

5 things to know about the 9-11 museum

In this May 5, 2014 photo released by the National September 11 Memorial Museum, a firetruck, damaged in the attacks of September 11, 2001, is on display at the New York museum. The long-delayed museum will be dedicated during a ceremony Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/ National September 11 Memorial Museum, Jin Lee)

Enlarge Image

In this May 5, 2014 photo released by the National September 11 Memorial Museum, a firetruck, damaged in the attacks of September 11, 2001, is on display at the New York museum. The long-delayed museum will be dedicated during a ceremony Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/ National September 11 Memorial Museum, Jin Lee)

The Sept. 11 museum opens to the public May 21, preceded by a ceremony Thursday that's to include President Barack Obama, families and other officials. Five things to know about the museum:

___

ITS MISSION

The exhibits tell the stories of the nearly 3,000 people killed in the 2001 attacks and the 1993 trade centre bombing, as well as of survivors and first responders. Museum Director Alice Greenwald said the museum is "about understanding our shared humanity," while former mayor Michael Bloomberg called it a reminder "that freedom is not free."

___

MUSEUM'S SIZE

The museum occupies 110,000 square feet on the 16-acre trade centre site, tracing the foundations of the twin towers 70 feet underground.

___

CONSTRUCTION AND FOUNDATION

Below the Sept. 11 memorial plaza, with its two fountains outlining the footprints of the towers, the museum reaches down to bedrock, where the towers' steel columns were anchored. It's bounded by a slurry wall that kept back the Hudson River after the attack.

___

COSTS

The plaza and museum together cost $700 million to build, subsidized with $390 million in tax-funded grants; officials hope the $24 museum entrance fee expected to generate about $40 million a year will help cover operating costs, expected to be about $60 million a year. Fundraising will cover the rest, for now.

___

SPECIAL ARTIFACT

Among the more than 10,000 artifacts, 23,000 still images and 500 hours of video and film, plus 1,970 oral histories, one special item is what Patricia Reilly looked for among the displays during an earlier tour for families: her sister's picture ID card from the 101st floor office in the south tower where she died.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Sudden Surge: Flood of 2014
Opportunity Magazine — The Bakken
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media