Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Bomb planted at bus terminal in northwest Pakistan kills 14 passengers

A Pakistani man, who was injured in a bomb blast in Kohat, receives treatment at a hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014. A bomb planted at a busy bus terminal near a police station in northwest Pakistan exploded Sunday, killing several people and wounding many near the country's lawless tribal region, authorities said. The explosion targeted passengers in a motorized rickshaw and those on a mini-bus in Kohat, some 150 kilometers (100 miles) west of the capital, Islamabad, police official Iqbal Khan said. (AP Photo/Mohammed Zubair)

Enlarge Image

A Pakistani man, who was injured in a bomb blast in Kohat, receives treatment at a hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014. A bomb planted at a busy bus terminal near a police station in northwest Pakistan exploded Sunday, killing several people and wounding many near the country's lawless tribal region, authorities said. The explosion targeted passengers in a motorized rickshaw and those on a mini-bus in Kohat, some 150 kilometers (100 miles) west of the capital, Islamabad, police official Iqbal Khan said. (AP Photo/Mohammed Zubair)

PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A bomb planted at a busy bus terminal near a police station in northwest Pakistan killed 14 people and wounding 15 near the country's lawless tribal region, authorities said.

The explosion Sunday targeted passengers in a motorized rickshaw and those on a minibus in Kohat, some 150 kilometres (100 miles) west of the capital, Islamabad, police official Iqbal Khan said.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, though Kohat has seen past attacks by local Taliban fighters and allied sectarian groups against its minority Shiite population, which has a presence in the city and its outskirts.

Khan and police official Fazal Naeem said the vehicles targeted were bound for a Shiite-majority area, and suspected that the minority Muslims could have been the target of the attack.

Northwestern provincial police chief Nasir Durrani said security forces have been conducting counterinsurgency operations in the area.

Local Taliban militants have killed tens of thousands of Pakistanis in a bloody war against the state in a bid to overthrow the government and enforce their own harsh brand of Islamic Shariah law.

Pakistan's government recently started peace talks with the Taliban, but negotiations were suspended after the killing of 23 soldiers by a faction of the militant group and a militant-claimed bombing in southern port city of Karachi that killed 13 police officers.

Air force jets have been pounding militants' hideouts in various tribal regions near the Afghan border since the peace talks collapsed last week.

In the latest strikes, the air force hit militants' compounds and a bomb-making factory in the Tirah valley in Khyber tribal region, an army and an intelligence official said late Sunday. They claimed that at least 28 militants were killed.

They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media on record.

There was no way to independently confirm the report. The remote tribal area is off limits to journalists.

Both the Pakistani government and the local Taliban are demanding each other to initiate a cease-fire first to resume the talks.

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif long has favoured peace talks over military action to end the bloodshed in the northwest, but he is also under pressure from critics to retaliate for any Taliban violence.

One of the critics is an ethnic political party based in Karachi called the Muttahida Qaumi Movement.

The party on Sunday held an anti-Taliban rally to express solidarity with Pakistan's security forces. Thousands of people demonstrated and were addressed by the party leader Altaf Hussain by phone from London.

"Taliban are cancer for Pakistan. Taliban are cancer for the humanity," he said.

___

Associated Press writer Adil Jawad in Karachi contributed to this report.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Submit a Random Act of Kindness
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media