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US man sentenced to at least 17 years in prison for killing woman on porch

Theodore Wafer is led out of the courtroom by Wayne County Sheriff, Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014, 2014, in Detroit, after he was sentenced to at least 17 years in prison for killing an unarmed woman on his porch. During the trial, he said he shot 19-year-old Renisha McBride because he feared for his life, but a jury rejected Wafer's claim of self-defense. (AP Photo/Detroit News, Clarence Tabb Jr.) DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

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Theodore Wafer is led out of the courtroom by Wayne County Sheriff, Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014, 2014, in Detroit, after he was sentenced to at least 17 years in prison for killing an unarmed woman on his porch. During the trial, he said he shot 19-year-old Renisha McBride because he feared for his life, but a jury rejected Wafer's claim of self-defense. (AP Photo/Detroit News, Clarence Tabb Jr.) DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT; HUFFINGTON POST OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

DETROIT - A man who killed an unarmed woman on his porch instead of calling police was sentenced Wednesday to at least 17 years in prison after telling the victim's family he would carry "guilt and sorrow forever."

Judge Dana Hathaway followed the recommendation of prosecutors in the case of Theodore Wafer, who was convicted of second-degree murder in the death of 19-year-old Renisha McBride.

Wafer, 55, opened the front door of his house in suburban Detroit and shot McBride through a screen door last Nov. 2. He said he was awakened by pounding before dawn and feared for his life. A jury rejected his self-defence claim.

"Although the evidence clearly showed that Miss McBride made some terrible choices that night, none of them justified taking her life," the judge said. "I do not believe that you're a cold-blooded murderer or that this case had anything to do with race or that you're some sort of monster.

"I do believe that you acted out of some fear but mainly anger and panic," Hathaway said. "An unjustified fear is never an excuse for taking someone's life. ... So what do we have? One life gone and one life ruined."

No one knows why McBride ended up at Wafer's home about 4:30 a.m. Prosecutors speculated she may have been seeking help hours after crashing her car about half a mile (one kilometre) away in Detroit. An autopsy revealed she was extremely drunk.

Wafer is white and McBride was black, and some wondered in the aftermath of the shooting whether race was a factor, likening it to the shooting of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. But race was hardly mentioned at trial.

With his back to the courtroom gallery, Wafer told the judge that he killed a woman who was "too young to leave this world."

"I will carry that guilt and sorrow forever," he said, often pausing to control his emotions.

Wafer was convicted last month of second-degree murder, manslaughter and unlawful use of a gun. The trial centred on whether he had a reasonable and honest belief that he was in peril. He said he couldn't immediately find his cellphone to call police and grabbed a shotgun instead.

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Follow Ed White at http://twitter.com/edwhiteap

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