Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? It's an Internet flap when bird strike confused with airline name

FILE - In this July 29, 2006 file photo, ground staffs check for the readiness of passenger planes of Nok Air, front, and Air Asia, rear, during a commercial test flight at Bangkok's new international airport, the Suvarnabhumi Airport, on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand. A Thai AirAsia plane hit a bird Tuesday, June 10, 2014 during a flight in Thailand, where the word for bird is

Enlarge Image

FILE - In this July 29, 2006 file photo, ground staffs check for the readiness of passenger planes of Nok Air, front, and Air Asia, rear, during a commercial test flight at Bangkok's new international airport, the Suvarnabhumi Airport, on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand. A Thai AirAsia plane hit a bird Tuesday, June 10, 2014 during a flight in Thailand, where the word for bird is "nok," sparking social media confusion over whether the aircraft had collided with a plane from budget carrier Nok Air. Within hours of the collision, Nok Air went to Twitter to set the story straight: "We would like to clarify that Nok Air did not clip another aircraft today." The tweet added that the other aircraft had hit a real bird. The Airbus A320-200, carrying 151 passengers from Bangkok to southern Nakhon Si Thammarat, landed safely Wednesday morning but the impact left "a scratch" on the edge of the left wing, Thai AirAsia said in a statement. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)

BANGKOK - A Thai AirAsia plane hit a bird Tuesday during a flight in Thailand, where the word for bird is "nok," sparking social media confusion over whether the aircraft had collided with a plane from budget carrier Nok Air.

Within hours of the collision, Nok Air went to Twitter to set the story straight: "We would like to clarify that Nok Air did not clip another aircraft today." The tweet added that the other aircraft had hit a real bird.

The Airbus A320-200, carrying 151 passengers from Bangkok to southern Nakhon Si Thammarat, landed safely Wednesday morning but the impact left "a scratch" on the edge of the left wing, Thai AirAsia said in a statement.

The airline's chief engineer, Banyat Hansakul, described the damage as a small hole in the wing.

Engineers inspected and repaired the wing before the aircraft returned to Bangkok after a three-hour delay, the airline said.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
Sudden Surge: Flood of 2014
Opportunity Magazine — The Bakken
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media