Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

US reviewing ivory seizure rules after teens' bagpipes confiscated at border crossing

CONCORD, N.H. - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will review its rules about ivory imports after two teenagers' bagpipes were seized at the Canadian border, a spokesman said Friday.

The spokesman, Neil Mendelsohn, said customs agents were following established laws designed to prevent the import and export of illegally harvested ivory when they seized pipes belonging to Campbell Webster and Eryk Bean, 17-year-olds who compete on an international level.

Ivory harvested since 1976 is banned in the U.S.

"Our headquarters is examining this and looking at the policy and the regulations understanding that musicians do have a unique situation," Mendelsohn said. "And we try to be reasonable, but for right now the rules are the rules. Any instrument these days could be made from elephant parts that might not be an antique."

The discord started Sunday when Campbell and Eryk were driving back from Canada after a competition that served as a tuneup for next weekend's World Pipe Band Championships in Glasgow, Scotland. Campbell's pipes date to 1936 and were played by his father, Gordon Webster, who was the 9th Sovereign Piper to Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Because the teens were using a "nondesignated" border crossing, they needed extra permits and inspection fees totalling $576 to carry the pipes, with their ivory projecting mounts, across the border. They didn't have the paperwork, and the pipes were confiscated for a day.

The boys eventually got their pipes back and are in Glasgow, where their adventure has been the talk of the competition, Campbell's mother, Lezlie, said Friday.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Election 2014
Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100
Why Not Minot?
Welcome to Winnipeg

Social Media