Accessibility/Mobile Features
Skip Navigation
Skip to Content
Editorial News
Classified Sites

The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Woman improves after unknowingly drinking iced tea laced with industrial cleaner at restaurant

Dickey's Barbecue Pit is shown Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014, in South Jordan, Utah. Police say a woman was in extremely critical condition after drinking sweet tea laced with an industrial cleaning chemical at Dickey's Barbecue Pit. South Jordan Police Cpl. Sam Winkler says the 67-year-old woman was eating at Dickey's Barbecue Pit on Sunday when she poured herself a glass of tea from the beverage bar. Winkler says the woman took a sip and her mouth started burning. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Enlarge Image

Dickey's Barbecue Pit is shown Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014, in South Jordan, Utah. Police say a woman was in extremely critical condition after drinking sweet tea laced with an industrial cleaning chemical at Dickey's Barbecue Pit. South Jordan Police Cpl. Sam Winkler says the 67-year-old woman was eating at Dickey's Barbecue Pit on Sunday when she poured herself a glass of tea from the beverage bar. Winkler says the woman took a sip and her mouth started burning. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

SALT LAKE CITY - A woman who unknowingly drank iced tea laced with an industrial cleaning solution at a Utah restaurant has whispered and gotten out of bed, her lawyer said Saturday.

The progress marks the first sign of improvement for Jan Harding since the 67-year-old was rushed to a hospital nearly a week ago with severe burns to her mouth and throat, according to family attorney Paxton Guymon.

The heavy-duty cleaner that ended up in the sweetened iced tea Harding drank Sunday at a Dickey's Barbecue in a Salt Lake City suburb was unintentionally mixed into a bag of sugar, which a worker later added into the iced tea dispenser, authorities have said.

Harding's breathing tube has been removed, and she was doing well without it, Guymon said in an email.

She had not been able to speak in days, nor had she been on her feet before standing briefly with the help of nurses, according to Guymon. "Everyone is more optimistic today," he wrote. "Any such sign of improvement is good news."

Her husband and their three adult children have been at her bedside, praying for her recovery from the deep, ulcerated burns in her upper esophagus that have left her in critical condition at a Salt Lake City hospital.

The cleaning product is meant for degreasing deep fryers and contains the odourless chemical lye, the active ingredient in drain cleaners.

South Jordan Cpl. Sam Winkler said police are waiting to see what happens with Harding's condition before moving forward with any arrests or charges.

Dickey's Barbecue Restaurants Inc. said in a statement late Friday that it was an isolated incident and nothing like it had happened in the 73 years the Dallas-based chain has operated.

"There is nothing more important to us than the trust and safety of our guests," the statement said, adding that the franchise owner, John Thomson, was deeply saddened and is co-operating with authorities.

Police have determined Harding was the only victim, Winkler said. It appears she was the first to drink the tea, and Dickey's employees disposed of it after she was burned, he said.

The establishment remains open after county health officials inspected it and found all chemicals properly labeled and separated from food items.

  • Rate this Rate This Star Icon
  • This article has not yet been rated.
  • We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high. If you thought it was well written, do the same. If it doesn’t meet your standards, mark it accordingly.

    You can also register and/or login to the site and join the conversation by leaving a comment.

    Rate it yourself by rolling over the stars and clicking when you reach your desired rating. We want you to tell us what you think of our articles. If the story moves you, compels you to act or tells you something you didn’t know, mark it high.

Sort by: Newest to Oldest | Oldest to Newest | Most Popular 0 Commentscomment icon

You can comment on most stories on brandonsun.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is register and/or login and you can join the conversation and give your feedback.

There are no comments at the moment. Be the first to post a comment below.

Post Your Commentcomment icon

Comment
  • You have characters left

The Brandon Sun does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. Comments are moderated before publication. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Brandon Sun Business Directory
The First World War at 100

Social Media