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World Health Organization scientist in Germany for Ebola treatment after Sierra Leone stint

A man in special protection suit sits in an ambulance in front of the entrance of Eppendorf hospital in Hamburg, Germany, Wednesday Aug. 27, 2014. Officials say an epidemiologist who was infected with Ebola while working for the World Health Organization in Sierra Leone has arrived in Germany for treatment. Hamburg health department spokesman Roland Ahrendt said Wednesday the doctor would be treated in the city’s UKE hospital at WHO’s request. WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib said the patient is a man from Senegal who was working for the WHO as a consultant when infected by the virus in Sierra Leone. To date, the WHO says more than 240 health care workers have developed the disease in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, and more than 120 have died. (AP Photo/dpa,Georg Wendt)

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A man in special protection suit sits in an ambulance in front of the entrance of Eppendorf hospital in Hamburg, Germany, Wednesday Aug. 27, 2014. Officials say an epidemiologist who was infected with Ebola while working for the World Health Organization in Sierra Leone has arrived in Germany for treatment. Hamburg health department spokesman Roland Ahrendt said Wednesday the doctor would be treated in the city’s UKE hospital at WHO’s request. WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib said the patient is a man from Senegal who was working for the WHO as a consultant when infected by the virus in Sierra Leone. To date, the WHO says more than 240 health care workers have developed the disease in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, and more than 120 have died. (AP Photo/dpa,Georg Wendt)

BERLIN - A scientist who was infected with Ebola while working for the World Health Organization in Sierra Leone began receiving treatment Wednesday in a Hamburg hospital after being flown overnight to Germany.

The man, whose name and condition are being withheld for patient privacy reasons, is being treated at the U.N. agency's request in city's University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, home to the well-known Bernhard-Nocht Clinic for Tropical Medicine.

"Hamburg has a special expertise in caring for tropical diseases," said Internal Medicine director Ansgar Lohse. "That's the reason the request was addressed to us."

WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib identified the patient as a man from Senegal infected while working for the agency as a consultant.

To date, WHO says more than 240 health care workers have developed the disease in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria; more than 120 have died.

Dr. Stefan Schmiedel, who is helping oversee the treatment, said the clinic would not be using experimental medicine, instead concentrating on "supportive care" such as fever reduction and fluid management.

"In West Africa the patients die relatively quickly of the illness, or survive and then return to health," he said. "How that will go under our medical supervision, we can't yet estimate."

Christy Feig, director of WHO communications, said a team of two experts was sent Tuesday to investigate how the infectious disease expert was exposed to the Ebola virus.

She said the epidemiologist was a surveillance officer, a job that typically involves co-ordinating the outbreak response by liaising with local health workers, lab experts and hospitals but not direct treatment of patients.

"He wasn't in treatment centres normally," she said by telephone from Sierra Leone. "It's possible he went in there and wasn't properly covered, but that's why we've taken this unusual measure — to try to figure out what happened."

She said the team is checking if there is an infection risk in the living and working environment that has not been uncovered.

"The international surge of health workers is extremely important and if something happens, if health workers get infected and it scares off other international health workers from coming, we will be in dire straits," she said.

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Associated Press Medical Writer Maria Cheng contributed to this report from London.

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