SCO survey focuses on trauma, healing

Advertisement

Advertise with us

Leading up to the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Sept. 30, the Southern Chiefs’ Organization is asking survivors of residential schools and their descendants to share their stories to guide future programming.

Read this article for free:

or

Already have an account? Log in here »

We need your support!
Local journalism needs your support!

As we navigate through unprecedented times, our journalists are working harder than ever to bring you the latest local updates to keep you safe and informed.

Now, more than ever, we need your support.

Starting at $4.99/month you can access your Brandon Sun online and full access to all content as it appears on our website.

Subscribe Now

or call circulation directly at (204) 727-0527.

Your pledge helps to ensure we provide the news that matters most to your community!

Leading up to the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Sept. 30, the Southern Chiefs’ Organization is asking survivors of residential schools and their descendants to share their stories to guide future programming.

The Southern Chiefs’ Organization, which represents Anishinaabe and Dakota nations in southern Manitoba, is using a survey to ask survivors of the residential and day school system and their descendants for their guidance and priorities.

“We’re in crisis in many of our communities,” Jerry Daniels, grand chief of the Southern Chiefs’ Organization, told the Sun. The organization is considering what would help with trauma and healing, he added.

Southern Chiefs' Organization Grand Chief Jerry Daniels says his organization is seeking input from First Nations to guide the SCO's future programming. (Winnipeg Free Press)

In a Thursday press release, Daniels said hearing from the survivors was of “utmost importance” to the organization to ensure that it is aligning its actions with the needs of its citizens.

“This is about listening to our citizens and bringing healing and reconciliation to our nations,” Daniels said.

Intergenerational trauma from the residential school system and the ‘60s Scoop is something that Debbie Huntinghawk, a program co-ordinator at the Brandon Friendship Centre, said affects many Indigenous individuals and families.

“We’ve all been affected,” Huntinghawk said.

Huntinghawk’s grandmother had 13 children. Five of them were sent to residential schools, and she hid the other eight, even though Huntinghawk said she could have been sent to jail if she’d been caught.

Sharing stories like her grandmother’s experience, and discussing what still needs to happen to help survivors and their families heal, is something that needs to happen, Huntinghawk said.

“That way you end that cycle.”

The short survey, which is open to all southern First Nation citizens, asks participants how best to achieve education and awareness, healing and accountability and how to honour the children who did not return home from residential schools. The responses will be analyzed and compiled into a report that Daniels said will guide the direction of the Southern Chiefs’ Organization.

The survey will run for six weeks, ending Oct. 27. It can be found at the organization’s website, scoinc.mb.ca.

» mleybourne@brandonsun.com

» Twitter: @miraleybourne

Report Error Submit a Tip

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Local

LOAD MORE LOCAL